Behold the Data Transport Systems Project

So you've read about our methodology, and you understand that it's all about the distribution of bits that the recipient considers valuable. You've read the map, and the essay that goes with it.

But how will all this be put into practice? For that, you need our Data Transport Systems project - think of it as Telco 2017. From here to October, Martin Geddes, Rafil Khatib, Keith McMahon and I will be inquiring into how the forces detailed in the maps will twist the telecoms industry over the next 10 years. We'll be looking at everything from BitTorrent to cinemas and USB sticks, and drawing lessons from electricity grids and container shipping networks on how mass wholesale businesses can make very personalised, targeted ones possible.

Not just that, but we're also interested in failure.

We'll be looking at the differences between things that succeed and then go obsolete, and the ones that hit the trees at the edge of the airfield. MMS, this means you. There's also going to be peering, interconnection, and the pressing question of whether telecoms is going to be a for-profit activity in 2017, rather than a huge cost centre like a corporate IT department, a government agency, or Haiti with routers. And if it is still profitable, where it will be making money.

Remember, the Map says by then we'll see "other" passing broadband, steamphone, and NGN added together. DTS is intended to answer the question of what the other will be. It's traditional to say that the future might be X, Y, or "something we can't imagine yet"; but it's also trivial. It's abundantly clear that the traditional telco model won't be "it", but there are also good reasons to imagine that classic ISPs are not "the future" (so many are morphing into sizable telcolike entities, after all). So what will the synthesis be?